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Product Design: AARK Collective

Product Design: AARK Collective

AARK Collective is a brand that makes totally beautiful and minimalistic watches based in Melbourne, Australia. Built for the love of design, this team of only 4 people have created something I would wear not only because of the style but also its primary feature. Giving me the time. Our influences are diverse but we share a desire to make objects that are lasting and unique. We're focused on simple forms, obsessed with tiny details and inspired by the challenge of balancing function and beauty in wearable design. Most of all, we love sharing our work with likeminded people. All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective All Rights by AARK Collective Links More info about AARK Collective: https://aarkcollective.com Follow AARK Collective on Instagram: https://instagram.com/aark_collective

Sublime Lettering Works by Luke Lucas

Sublime Lettering Works by Luke Lucas

Luke Lucas is a freelance creative art director, illustrator, designer and typographer currently based in Melbourne, Australia. Since 2011, living the happy life as a Dad; Luke has also worked with Nike, Target USA, Esquire, the New York Times and more. The versatility of his work is just so impressive and definitely inspiring! ...I love that the same word, passage or even letter can be treated in bunch of different ways and embody entirely different meanings... That and through subtleties like a slight shift in line weight, the elongation of a tail or the arc you use, a letter can go from contemporary to traditional or happy to sad in a single stroke... All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas All Rights to Luke Lucas Links More info about Luke Lucas: http://www.lukelucas.com Follow Luke on Behance: https://www.behance.net/Luke_Lucas Follow Luke on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_LukeLucas Via Behance

Surf's Up with Kalle Lundholm Photography

Surf's Up with Kalle Lundholm Photography

Kalle Lundholm is actually named Karl Lundholm and he’s a graphic artist, digital asset manager and a photo retoucher currently based in Australia. Travelling and discovering new places has been his creative boost to focus on his interest and passion of Photography. Kalle sees Photography as an expression of Art and by also side kicking with being a photo retoucher. Now let's surf! ...Being able to work with the things I’m passionate about is important for me, as it really makes me happy. All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm All Rights to Kalle Lundholm Links More info about Kalle Lundholm: http://www.kallelundholm.com Follow Kalle on Instagram: http://instagram.com/gubbfet

Beautiful Sculptures made of Glass by Ben Young

Beautiful Sculptures made of Glass by Ben Young

Ben Young is a self-taught sculpture artist with over 10 years experience, based in Sydney, Australia. Being passionate about sculpting with glass for so long, Ben’s work is completely by hand, sheet after sheet of cautiously cut pieces of glass. We can imagine that is a lot of work but the results are just the “state-of-the-art”. ...I work with 2D shapes and have to figure out how to translate that into a 3D finished product. Sometimes my start point changes dramatically as shapes can be limited – I can’t create any internal right angles – so I have to find a way to layer the glass to create certain shapes. All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill All Rights to Ben Young with Robert Gray Photography and Zico O’Neill Links More info about Ben Young: http://www.brokenliquid.com Follow Ben on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/benyoungsculpture

Interview with Dave Foster

Dave Foster is a type designer based in Sydney, Australia whose work brought my attention while looking for typography works on Behance. It's really outstanding his ability to work with both digital and traditional as the result it's just impeccable. Today we had the opportunity to interview him and know more about his career and life. You can see more from Dave on the following links: Website Behance Facebook Twitter Blog Instagram 1) First of all I would like to thank you for doing this interview, it's an honour for us to present more about you to our readers. I would like to start asking you about when your interest for letters and type? Thanks for having me. I left school early, when I was about 16. I was invited to go to a graphic design college in Sydney where I received a degree in visual communication when I was 19. That course was the point when I began to learn about graphic design, and more specifically typography. I had a great teacher, Peter McGill who introduced me to letters and how to treat them with respect. From there, a curiosity propelled my interested and growth in that area. Holstee commissioned lettering2) Which people inspire you? Since finishing my masters in typeface design at The Royal Academy of Art in 2012, I've been fortunate enough to meet many practitioners in the field of type design and lettering that I respect immensely. My inspiration often comes from my many named and unnamed predecessors as well as my present day colleagues. Over the years many people have had a big influence on me. For lettering to name only a few, I love the work of Ken Barber, Jon Contino, Erik Marinovich, Alex Trochut, Martina Flor, Rob Clarke, Steven Bonner, Sergey Shapiro, John Langdon and Ian Brignell. For type designers I particularly enjoy the work and approach of Matthew Carter, Jonathan Hoefler and Tobias Frere-Jones, Christian Schwartz and Paul Barnes, Kris Sowersby, Fred Smeijers, Jean François Porchez, Jeremy Tankard, Jackson Cavanaugh and of course every one of my teachers from The Royal Academy from whom I began learning about type. Cycling Prints3) How did you develop your style and how would you describe it? I'm still trying to figure out what it is exactly that ties my body of work together. I don't know if I really have a style, not one I aspire to at least. For lettering, I just try to do whatever is appropriate for the message. Whatever it is though, I'm always searching for balance and it's extremely elusive. Lettering to commemorate a 50th wedding anniversary.4) Describe to us a bit about your creative process while creating a piece of lettering. Whether it's typefaces or lettering, iteration is my main tool. By that I mean I do it once, then I do it again, and again, changing details and developing it until it reaches a point that I'm happy with it. If I was drawing a word, I usually make a small scale rough, then I enlarge and refine or draw the word again from the start, or trace over the top in ink. 5) What's would you consider the best moment of your career till now and what would be the worst one? Please share with us more about your path. I know many people tend to dismiss awards as superficial and for the large part kind of pointless. But winning Gold at the Morisawa Type Design Competition was a real shifting point for me. Mainly because my work was validated by four type designers I hold in the highest regard. The cash prize was helpful, but this validation helped me more in deciding to concentrate on type and take it more seriously. It gave me confidence to at least try this path. I'm prepared for it to fail, but at least I won't have any regrets. The worst moments can seem bad at the time, but in hindsight I'm always happy they happen that way. I missed dream jobs, more than once, but if I'd got them, I wouldn't be doing what I'm doing now. It's all a matter of framing things in a positive way. As a graphic designer, I once worked in studio that made me incredibly anxious and even made me question my competence as a designer. But again, in hindsight, I found this was actually due to their culture, not my ability. But it doesn't change though that at the time it was horrible for me to go through. Roland DG6) How do you describe your daily routine? It's different every day, I just try to work hard consistently. Either way, it's filled with coffee and I generally work late too, when everyone is sleeping. I don't know why, I'm just more productive around that time. Lettering commissioned by New York based creative, John J Custer 7) What's your favorite media to work with and why? I love the feeling of oil enamel paint flowing from a fully loaded sign painters brush onto clean glass. That's just something special. Calligraphy as part of the Desktop Wallpaper Project8) Tell us five lessons you believe are really important. Do what you love doing. Know why you're doing it. Be nice to people. Back yourself. Be careful whose advice you take on board. Royal Life Saving Society9) Tell us five websites that you like to visit. www.lettersofnote.com, www.27bslash6.com, www.grainedit.com, www.recollection.com.au, www.cyclingcentral.com.au Custom lettering for the 2012 Annual Report and meeting of the USGBC. 10) Thanks again for your time, please leave a final message for anyone considering a similar path. Type design is hard work, only do it because you love it. Twitter Calligraphy

Dark and Expressive Artworks by Anthony Lister

Anthony Lister is , on his own words, an inventor painter. Nowadays I would dare to say he's more than that, as besides all experiments he already found a quite interesting and expressive style. As he said in one of his interviews, he works for the process not for the result. You can see some more of lister at his Website.

The Extreme Bucket of Infinity List

Located in Melbourne, Australia, Infinity List is a cinematic sports experience. And their focus is to give us a daily dose of both beautiful and entertaining videos on extreme sports. Buckled up and get ready to live the experience of freedom. Hope you will enjoy them! For more information about Infinity List, you can visit their website at InfinitList.com. Experience Freedom Experience Zero Gravity Experience Human Flight" Need For Speed: Hot Pursuit Trailer" Tunisian Duel: Ride the Desert" Chris Bryan Films: Phantom Reel" Malta Cliff Diving 2011" APEX Movement 2012" On Assignment" A Story for Tomorrow"

Worldwide Photography #45: Brisbane

Worldwide Photography is a series of posts where every week we're going to show a city or location around the globe bringing the coolest photography samples of it. The photographs authors are all credited right above their pictures. Today feature: Brisbane, Australia. For the next week we're going to feature Portland, USA so if you want to send your submissions for the next Worldwide Photography, please tweet the tag #wwphoto and the link of the photo(s) on twitter. I'll be wainting for your submissions :) sonofcocosonofcocoallan_s_jacksonJustinDunnthe-name-was-takenNic (Luckypenguin)Nic (Luckypenguin)geoff.aucklandNic (Luckypenguin)Andy Denfordbrendon quilty' Toshio 'Nic (Luckypenguin)rohanD90MrJoeycoremonkeyc.netgeoff.aucklandstarman 777William BullimoreIronlakGarry - www.visionandimagination.comReedy PhotographyWilliam Bullimore[ Rodelicious ]WilliamBullimoreMisho BaranovicCyronPacoAlcantara[ Rodelicious ]ash-sPeter SneddonChas LoveLettersscorpio.birdSheba_AlsopizzodisevoS@ilorbrewbooksKomshikipizzodisevo

Beautiful Central Institute of Technology, in Australia

This project is the result of a competition conducted in 2006 by the Central Institute of Technology (CIT) in Australia. A building that had an interesting concept, mixing boldness and beauty in the beautiful city of Leederville. Created with the aim of aiding research by architects and engineers, the project authored by offices Lyons and Perth architectural company T&Z had the challenge to integrate an existing and an old building. So it was created what is called "Social Heart", with a local connection between the building and the street, becoming not only a landmark of the campus, but also an important lobby for the common good of learning and other educational spaces within the building. © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z A new $45M TAFE training facility for Architecture, Engineering and Beauty students for Central Institute of TAFE’s (CIT) Northbridge Campus. This building provides 12,000m2 GFA over 4 levels inclusive of flexible teaching spaces, 2 lecture theatres, a central precinct library, staff office facilities and a large urban foyer named the ‘Social Heart’ that will become a focal point for CIT’s exhibitions and events. © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z © Lyons, Perth architectural company T&Z

Collaborative Work at Ecosciences Precinct

The coworking method it's been well accepted even in science. This building, located in Brisbane, Australia, is a typical model of this philosophy of work, and shows that the architecture can become this spaces integrated and private at the same time. The Ecoscience Precinct, project by architecture office Hassel, gathers more than a thousand cintistas in one place, in a collaborative research . Was even a little strange for these scientists, which were previously classified studies now being done side by side with other professionals. But while the exchange of experiences is something that intensifies this format work. The project has been designed with no walls and very bright spaces. They created a protective layer of aluminum around the building as sunscreens, as the location needed special care of heat and natural lighting. © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones

Beautiful Faculty of Law, in Sydney

This project of a Faculty of Law is the result of an international competition that took office FJMT chosen to develop this as it is a architecture landmark at the University of Sydney, Australia. Besides all the aesthetic appeal, the big difference of this project is the concern with sustainability, among the innovation includes a facade with double-skin, allowing ventilation and control of direct sunlight. Another focus of the project is in the learning process, combining the formal and informal, the physical and virtual, all designed with comfort and allowing inspire all students. This project has won numerous awards such as AIA Awards for Architecture, Urban Design and Sustainability. © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT The architects have designed an elegant and spacious structure that cannot fail to inspire our academic staff, administrators and students. A functional and beautiful environment respects those who use the spaces and motivates all who work in the building. — Professor Gillian Triggs (Dean, Sydney Law School) © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT © Courtesy of FJMT

Boldness on the New South Wales Law Building

This incredible project breaks all the paradigms with regard to buildings for law schools. The bold forms both the interior and on all fronts show that the architecture can be bold in any utility. The project by Lyons Architects is for the new building Faculty of Law on the New South Wales University, on Australia. The main goal was to make a building with a few floors to increase interaction between all occupants, teachers, students and visitors. The interior of the building is amazing, there is a mixture of shapes and materials which makes each room unique. The library is the heart of the college, where students and teachers can study and socialize with a view to the beautiful wooded area of the university. © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography This project for the Faculty of Law at the University of New South Wales incorporates a range of small and large scale teaching spaces - including Harvard-style lecture theatres in an integrated four level teaching and learning environment. A student focussed 'agora' space and central stair connect each level of the building promoting vertical connectivity and interaction. © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography © John Gollings Photography Thanks ArchiDaily for the tip.

Glasshouse Conference Centre in Australia

The Glasshouse is the new center for art and culture of Port Macquarie in Australia. The project, beyond the center of Conferences, includes an art gallery, a theater and a community workshop place. The project was executed by the group Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects. The design of the building was projected to explore the views of the Pacific Ocean, using large glass windows and even brises to control the sunlight. The building interiors seems to be very cozy and quiet in the conference rooms and theater. The way the acoustics was worked in this building, with a caution on each wooden board, seems to be fantastic! For sure this is a building that I want to visit when I go to Australia. The exterior building expression is generated by the contrasting orders of the city grid and the voluminous form of the theater shell, with it’s level 3 echo, the glass ’skirt’ cantilevering over Clarence Street. - TZG Architects Inside, the cultural elements are slightly overlapped to mix, rather than isolate, the activities. For instance, the gallery shares the same foyer space as the theater, allowing the exhibitions to fill all the public spaces of the building. - TZG Architects Photography by Brett Boardman and Rob Connell Thanks Contemporist for the tip!

The Menzies Institute in Melbourne, by Lyons

This building is really intriguing, it remembers me Frank Gehry when I saw the curves and shapes of the windows. But this is the Menzies Institute, a building at the University of Tasmania, designed by Lyon Architects, from Melbourne. The first thought that passed me when I saw this building was that they wanted to pass security to those inside it and at the same time they wanted to invite anyone passing by to come inside, I could be wrong as to the first part, but surely this corner with a huge opening in its external "skin" invites everyone going through the sidewalk. The Menzies Institute houses laboratories, accommodations for students and medical facilities. It does not reflect exactly that looking up outside, but as the architects themselves say: At the core of the concept is the creation of a ‘new culture’, reinforced in the building’s image and its social and functional planning. As a public building of the city, it invites the public participation of the street through its corner entry; large transparent steel windows and glazed atrium space which is shaped by an organic steel formed structure separating MS1 and the existing heritage building (Hollydene House). Thanks Dezeen for the tip!

Architecture for the Community at the Surry Hills Library

This library, located in Surry Hills, Australia, shows how important it is to have the participation of those who will use the space after the construction of a project. The architects from the FJMT a> office decided that for this project, the community would be participating in several decisions, which resulted in a gorgeous and totally usable building. The first idea was that community would like to have something beyond a simple library. The construction should be a place where everyone could share some activity. So they managed to host a library, a community center and even a child care for the neighborhood's children, showing the importance of having activities like these in one place. And to complete, the architects Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp put a lot of wisdom in certain choices, such as the use of transparency as a way of inviting the public into the building just as enabling a new way of viewing the neighborhood to those inside. The concern about he materials, to maintain an internal cooling of all spaces make this project a great inspiration to all of us who like architecture. The Centre has been designed to achieve excellence in sustainable design and set new high standards in environmental performance for multi-purpose public buildings. [It] will be a starting point for the development of a green rating system for public buildings… [and] an innovative example of design and sustainable design possibilities. — Lord Mayor Clover Moore MP © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings This innovative new building provides specific services tailored to community needs and includes an integrated local library, community centre and child care centre. - FJMT © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings © John Gollings Thanks ArchDaily for the tip.

One Shelley Street, The Macquarie Group Offices

One Shelley Street is an impressive place. Planned to break all kinds of space composition paradigms, Clive Wilkinson Architects implemented the project for the Macquarie Group, creating a modern environment to a investment company. Placed in Sydney, Australia, the project was conceived as a small villa, One Shelley Street abuses of enormous and flexible spaces with many functions, common areas are integrated to work environments and meeting rooms with panoramic views. A place with simple and modern lines, white in its majority but mixed with vibrant colors. A project that will be a referral point to the construction of sustainable offices buildings. Definitely a place that even Google would like to own! One Shelley Street has been designed to the highest levels of green star or LEED efficiency, using revolutionary technologies like harbor water cooling, chilled beams and zone controlled lighting. The business benefit of ABW is the elimination of ‘churn’—the cost of moving groups and redefining spaces. Investing now meant savings in the future and Macquarie is providing an unmatched quality of life for its employees—benefiting clients, investors, shareholders and the environment. For further information about this great project go to: clivewilkinson.com.

Fantastic Illustrations by Eamo Donnelly

Eamo Donnelly is an Australian based illustrator who is best known for his intricately hand inked, character driven illustrations, infused with an eclectically dynamic color palette with a true blue Aussie cheekiness. Eamo has illustrated for PLAYBOY, VH1, CBS Interactive, Chow.com, Maxim, Nike, Mountain Dew, ESPN, Complex, GQ, Men's Health, Runners World, Blender, King magazine, Redbull, Radar magazine, RipCurl, Monument, Jmag and Golden Plains. As well as commercial commissions, his love affair for Australian eighties nostalgia prompted him to create personal works that reflected the beauty and uniqueness of the culture he grew up in. These works have been seen on Jeeps for Mountain Dew, wallets for Poketo in L.A, shoes for String Republic in France, t-shirts for Owl Movement, esky's, stubby holders, clocks, bar walls and street posters and in exhibitions in Melbourne, Sydney and in the U.S and the U.K. In 2009 he was short listed for best original illustration in the Australian Desktop Create Awards and in 2010 he will be a speaker at Melbourne's Design Conference AGIdeas. He is also an occasional Australiana reviewer for Melbourne's online sub cultural guide ThreeThousand. For more information visit Eamo's website at http://www.eamo.com.au/ Your personal hero? Paul Hogan. YouTube the Paul Hogan Show from the ’70s and you’ll see why. His later works are still up there, but nothing beats his early oils on canvas from the 1976 period, such as “Leo Wanker”, “Donger”, “Getting fit with Arthur Dunger” and “Herb Guthrey, Mongrel breeder”. - Eamo,Design Reporter “Working across many areas has enhanced my career but that was never the intention,” he says. “My intention is always to try new things, to learn and to make work that I like. I suppose by making more work you become more visible, which leads to more contacts and more commissions.” - Interview for Computer Arts Videos EAMO NO COMPLY INKING TIME LAPSE from Jacky Winter on Vimeo. "AUSTRALIA. BE IN IT" Process - Lamington Drive Group Show from Jacky Winter on Vimeo.